Aboriginal Education Resources

(updated November 2017)

GENERAL ABORIGINAL EDUCATION & INDIGENIZATION RESOURCES

• Gord Downie’s The Secret Path Resources
• ERAC Aboriginal Education Support Resources
• Aboriginal Curriculum Integration Project
• Ministry of Education Aboriginal Education resources
• First Nations Education Steering Committee (FNESC) resources
• BCTF Aboriginal Education resources
• SD8 Aboriginal Education resources
• Metis National Council resources
Full Circle Indigenous Ways of Knowing resource
• Trafalgar School Library Resources (see Jeff or Monica for an up to date listing of novel sets, associated resources, etc.)
• ‘ABED Resources (FNESC)’ folder on the Teacher_Share network

GUESTS, ELDERS AND LOCAL SPECIALISTS

See Jeff for specific contact information of local resource folks and indigenous elders.

RECONCILIATION & RESIDENTIAL SCHOOLS

• Where are the Children (click on Resources tab)
• Residential School System (northern peoples focus)
• Reconciliation Canada (click on Resources tab)
• Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC) (teacher resources)
• Reconciliation In Other Countries
• Lost Generations (video testimonies of residential school survivors)

ENGLISH

• Aboriginal Curriculum Integration Project  SD79

Grade 7

  • Beasts and Berries, The Story of Tasdliz Bin (Part 1)
  • Beasts and Berries, The Story of Tasdliz Bin (Part 2)
  • Child of Tears (Raven Tales)
  • Labelling and Stereotyping
  • Poetry Lesson (And My Heart Soars)
  • Poetry Lesson (If…This is the World)
  • Poetry Lesson (My Box of Letters)
  • Poetry Lesson (When the Mask Opens)
  • The Story of Little Mouse Sister Part I
  • The Story of Little Mouse Sister Part II

Grade 8

  • Analyzing and Understanding Creation Stories
  • Free Verse Poetry Writing
  • Short Story Analysis – Naming Day

Grade 9

  • Personal Values
  • Lesson Units (Grades 2 – 12)
  • Analyzing Literature From Different Perspectives (6 lessons). This lesson unit applies to Raven Tales episodes 1-6.
  • Analyzing Literature From Different Perspectives (6 lessons). This lesson unit applies to Raven Tales episodes 7-12.

SOCIAL STUDIES

• Aboriginal Curriculum Integration Project SD79

The learning outcomes for these lessons have been linked to the Grades 7 through 11 curriculum, these lessons may be adapted for other grade learning outcomes.

MATHEMATICS

• Aboriginal Curriculum Integration Project SD79

Grades 7-9

The Geometry of the Ktunaxa Fish Trap (Using Pi to calculate circumference), Geometry of the Ktunaxa Fish Trap (The Pythagorean Theorem), Geometry of Spear Fishing (Pythagorean Theorem), Geometry of the Ktunaxa Fish Trap (Trigonometry)

SCIENCE

• Aboriginal Curriculum Integration Project SD 79

Grade 7

  • Assessing Human Needs for Survival
  • The Disappearance of Fraser River Salmon
  • Environmental Stewardship
  • Fish Farming and Local Environments
  • Food Webs and Environmental Stewardship
  • The Impact of Highways and Traffic
  • The Impacts on Water Pollution

Grade 8

  • Analyzing Food Nutrients
  • The Impact of Federal Policies on Aquatic Environments and Aboriginal People

GAMES & PHYSICAL EDUCATION

• Aboriginal Curriculum Integration Project SD79

Grades 4-9: Active Living, NAIG 2008, Holding Mini-NAIG games, Aboriginal Coaching Manual

• Aboriginal Hockey

The first hockey may have been played with carved one-piece sticks and whatever puck-like object happened to be lying around. It may have started as a winter version of an early type of lacrosse game that was invented by the First Nations hundreds of years ago. We know that the first hockey sticks were made in New Brunswick by the Mi’kmaq, over 100 years ago.

RESOURCE DATABASES

• Deepening Knowledge Project: OISE Aboriginal Peoples Curricula Database

The Deepening Knowledge Project seeks to infuse Aboriginal peoples’ histories, knowledges and pedagogies into all levels of education in Canada. The project is a part of the Ontario Institute for Studies in Education, University of Toronto, which is located on the territories of Anishinaabe and Onkwehonwe peoples. On this site you’ll find information about the history and traditions of First Nations, Métis, Inuit and Native American cultures, information about the challenges facing Aboriginal communities today, and curricula for incorporating this information into your teaching practice.

• Promising Practices in Aboriginal Education

This website allows educators, researchers and others to learn from the experiences of others about strategies described elsewhere that have been found to be successful in enhancing learning opportunities and improving educational success for Aboriginal students. The Promising Practices in Aboriginal Education Website, sponsored by the Martin Aboriginal Education Initiative (MAEI). MAEI’s guiding vision is t o empower Aboriginal students with the knowledge and confidence they need to complete secondary school and to continue their education.

•Getting to Know Turtle Island: Incorporating First Nation, Métis and Inuit Perspectives K-8

This document is called Getting to Know Turtle Island: Incorporating First Nation, Métis and Inuit Perspectives K-8 in order to reflect the process of learning about First Nation, Métis and Inuit peoples in Canada and the Kingston area. Many First Nations, including the Algonquin and Mohawks in the Limestone DSB area, have creation stories which describe the land, today known as North America, as being formed on the back of a turtle. They call this continent Turtle Island. While the Métis and Inuit have other names for North America, our title aims to be inclusive of all First Nation, Métis and Inuit cultures, traditions, and perspectives.

• Guide To Canadian Aboriginal Education Resources

This guide is a selected list of resources prepared from the Queen’s University Education Library.

• Full Circle: First Nations, Métis and Inuit Ways of Knowing (OSSTF)

The contributors to this resource self-identify as First Nations, Métis or Inuit, or have extensive experience working with Aboriginal students. They have created a resource that is authentic in its approach to sensitive, value-laden topics, and honours traditional “ways of knowing” by taking a holistic approach to each topic. The diversity among First Nations, Métis and Inuit people means that some teachings and symbols are not universally recognized by all Aboriginal people and the writers acknowledge this fact. Where possible, specific names and titles have been used to describe groups of people, however, the word “Aboriginal” has been used as a collective term to include First Nations, Métis and Inuit people as the original inhabitants of North America and their descendants.